New & Original Ostrich Grained Pu Leather Designer Women,s Shoulder Tote Handbag

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Vendeur: bagsfantastic (869) 99.3%, Lieu où se trouve: Glasgow, Lieu de livraison: Worldwide, Numéro de l'objet: 253802502086 NEW & ORIGINAL OSTRICH GRAINED PU LEATHER DESIGNER WOMEN,S BLACK SHOULDER TOTE HANDBAG Classic collection ostrich grain leather look handbag with gold detailing zip top closure with satine lining inner pockets for mobile smart phone and keys a zipped sections for those valuables wide winged designer look body comes with a long adjustable detachable shoulder strap bow ribbon feature detail this handbag has that designer look The Most Famous HandbagBags bazzar • October 23rd, 2017 • 0 CommentsThe most expensive handbag of all time, the Birkin, which Hermès named after Jane Birkin when the fashion house introduced it in 1984, is the definition of a status symbol for many people. For others, the cost starting at four figures and reaching six represents all that is wrong with society. Everyone seems to agree that to destroy one is an affront to decency Many were up in arms when Kate Moss used hers as a diaper bag. And when Lady Gaga “ruined” hers by having a fans write on it with a Sharpie. And, again, when Kanye West had George Condo paint on one for Kim Kardashian. Of course nothing upset people more than Tyler Shields, who notably paid $100,000 for a red crocodile-skin Birkin only to destroy it in the name of art. These reactions are obtuse at best. The birkin was conceived on a Air France Flight to London as the then chief exec Jean -Louise Dumas had sketched a handbag design on sick bag Jean commented on the design saying she would like a bag with pockets and so the Birkin was created as a symbol of luxury recognised through out the world to date Modern handbagsBags bazzar • October 23rd, 2017 • 0 CommentsWe recognise this centuries , art and fashion movements came and went in rapid succession and the handbag has evolved . However, women’s emancipation was the most influential factor in the shaping of the handbag. More and more women were employed and as they became more mobile, their handbags had to meet a growing variety of practical needs. This resulted in all sorts of bags for specific purposes such as leather document cases for going to the office, practical leather and plastic daytime bags for walking and visiting, elegant, sparkling bags and metal clutches for evening use. Branding became increasingly important during the 20th century and the great handbag designers emerged. Designers known all over the world for their exclusive handbags and leatherware include HermLouisVui, Gui and Pra. For fashion designers such as , the handbag has become an important accessory. In contrast with the past centuries, in which design could remain unchanged for many decades, the handbag has now developed into thee fashion accessory, ever changing colours ,materials and styles every season. THE HISTORY OF BAGS AND PURSES1500 – 1800 A.D.: Hanging Bags From the earliest stages of civilization, bags and purses were practical everyday articles used by men as well as women. They were necessary for carrying money and other personal items, since clothes hadn’t yet been fitted out with pockets. We know what they looked like from paintings, prints and tapestries and the few historical handbags preserved in museums. Such antique bags are rare because they were mostly made out of perishable materials. Bags and purses came in a variety of designs for a number of purposes, such as bags with clasps, leather pouches and purses with long drawstrings. With the exception of some rare shoulder bags, these were all worn attached to the belt or girdle. The introduction of pockets towards the end of the 16th century meant that the men’s bags slowly disappeared in the course of the 17th century. From then on, bags belonged almost exclusively to the women’s domain. From the 16th century onwards, women often wore their purses on a chatelaine; a hook with chains to which small utensils could be attached, such as keys, knife cases, scissors and sewing tools. Since chatelaines were often crafted from precious metals they were also considered as jewellery and status symbols. The design and accessories of the chatelaine evolved in the course of the centuries, but it wasn’t until the beginning of the 20th century that the handbag finally replaced it. In the 17th and 18th centuries and most of the 19th century, women’s clothing was so voluminous that one or two bags or pockets could easily be hidden underneath the skirt. Such pockets were usually worn in pairs: one hanging from each hip – hence the name thigh pockets. Thigh pockets remained en vogue for most of the 19th century. 1800 – 1900 A.D.: A New Era, New BagsWhen the Roman city of Pompeii was discovered in the 18th century, all things ancient Greek and Roman became immensely popular. This movement, Classicism, also had a profound impact on women’s fashion: dresses became straight and the waistline moved upwards. Underneath these delicate dresses was no room for thigh bags. Their content moved into the reticule, the first true handbag, carried on a chord or chain. Such bags were in fashion until the first decades of the 19th century. Reticules were handmade from all kinds of fabrics, often by the women who used them. During the 19th century, the age of the Industrial Revolution, many new manufacturing methods and techniques were invented. New materials such as papier-mâché, iron and polished steel emerged and were used for the production of bags which resulted in new models and designs. New bags were developed for the modern traveller, who could then journey more easily by boat and railway. Hand luggage for railway travel were the precursors of today’s handbags; carrier bags which were practical for travel, but could also be used when shopping or visiting. 1900 A.D. – Present:In the 20th century, art and fashion movements came and went in rapid succession and the handbag evolved alongside. However, women’s emancipation was the most influential factor in the shaping of the handbag. More and more women were employed and as they became more mobile, their handbags had to meet a growing variety of practical needs. This resulted in all sorts of bags for specific purposes such as leather document cases for going to the office, practical leather and plastic daytime bags for walking and visiting, elegant, sparkling bags and minaudières (metal clutches) for evening use. Branding became increasingly important during the 20th century and the great handbag designers emerged. Designers known all over the world for their exclusive handbags and leatherware include French Italian Spanish designers, the handbag has become an important accessory. In contrast with the past centuries, in which design could remain unchanged for many decades, the handbag has now developed into a fashion accessory, changing with every season. ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF ONE HUNDRED HANDBAGS The History of the Handbag Bags are not a new invention, as long as humans have had items to carry, we have created bags in which to carry them. As early as 38,000 BCE, hunter-gatherer, humans were using bundles and pouches made from fibers to store and transport food and tools. The drawstring purse was worn dangling from a belt by both men and women from at least the time of Ancient Rome to the Renaissance and beyond. The woman’s handbag as we know it, however, is a much more recent development in the long, humble history of the bag. The Birth of the Handbag Prior to the invention of the handbag, women carried necessities in pockets. But, unlike men’s pockets, which were part of a man’s garment, a woman’s pockets were an entirely separate garment, worn tied around the waist under her skirts. The large volume of women’s skirts made it easy to hide the bulk of pockets. This changed in the last decade of the eighteenth century, however, as high-waisted gowns gained popularity. Because of the slimmer silhouette of the new style gowns, it became a grave fashion faux pas to wear bulky pockets beneath one’s gown. Pocket-lines were the panty-lines of the 1790s and no fashion-forward woman would be caught sporting them. With the death of women’s pockets, came the birth of the women’s bag. The precursor to the modern handbag was the reticule or the indispensable, as it was sometimes called. The reticule was a small bag, only large enough to carry rouge, powder, a fan, perfume, and a few visiting cards, but women quickly took to carrying them whenever they went out. Not everyone viewed the indispensable as quite so indispensable, however. The Argument Against the Handbag The first handbags were essentially women’s pockets with handles attached to them, but women’s pockets, because they were worn under a woman’s skirts and close to her skin, were considered undergarments. So, when bags for women first became popular, many viewed them as vulgar or risque. These early handbags were also daring, one of the first examples of underwear as outerwear—and thus for many a rather absurd affectation. The idea of a woman parading her personal belongings in a visible pocket was an act akin to lifting up her skirts and publicly revealing her underwear. Aside from the scandalousness of parading one’s undergarments about for everyone to see, some women viewed handbags as a poor alternative to pockets. Early American feminists, in particular, fought the loss of pockets for women. They believed handbags would never be as practical as pockets and advocated for functional pockets built into women’s garments like pockets were for men. For these women, pockets for men and handbags for women became symbolic of the inequality between the sexes and the struggle for women’s equal rights, much in the way later feminists would view the bra. Whether one was in favor of or set against the handbag for women, in the absence of functioning pockets, a functional bag would quickly become an inescapable component of a woman’s daily life. Although it would go through many changes over the years, its size, shape, or decoration shifting with each new decade’s sensibilities, by the late-nineteenth century the handbag was here to stay. The Changing Form and Function of the Handbag With the rise of the department store as a respectable location for women to meet outside of their homes, it became possible for them to stay away from home for much longer than they could previously. With this newfound freedom came the need to carry more than what would fit in an impractically small reticule. At the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth, much more functional bags began to replace the reticule. Made by luggage creators like Ls V, these utilitarian bags, the first actually to be called hand-bags, were essentially miniature suitcases. They featured sturdy handles, multiple internal compartments, and a snap closure. These changes in the bag itself also marked a change in the idea of a woman’s handbag- it became something entirely her own. As noted by Anna Johnson in Handbags: The Power of the Purse: Unlike a flimsy mesh reticule or a decorative coin purse sealed by a string, this bag snapped shut, and for the first time, women could carry their things with some degree of privacy. Men, who had long carried a lady’s fan or her money, were supplanted by increasingly practical, brilliantly structured bags, and they have been mystified and excluded by the handbag ever since. In the post-World War I era, a woman’s role in society was rapidly changing, as women won liberties previously denied to them, including the right to vote. As the decade turned and they strode boldly into the Roaring Twenties and then the future beyond, greater changes were on the horizon for women and for the bags they carried along with them. The Handbag as a Reflection of the Times As the years progressed and handbags became further entrenched in women’s daily lives, they became a barometer for the times, adroitly reflecting the sensibilities of the women who sported them and the culture in which those women lived. In times of prosperousness and excess, women sported over-the-top bags. Jewelers in the 1930s created minaudières, small boxes carried like a clutch, which was crafted from luxurious materials, such as silver and gold. In the seventies, women carried bags made of shiny metals, made to reflect the bright lights on the disco dance floor. The conspicuous wealth and consumer culture of the 1980s produced large, flashy, highly-decorated status bags. The handbag, in these times, served as a status symbol, with the richest women carrying the most expensive bags. In the 1940s, women’s bags were simple and functional, reflecting the more sober sensibilities and limited resources of wartime. Shoulder bags, styled after the military satchels men carried on the war front, were worn slung over the shoulder or across the body as women walked or cycled to and from their jobs in support of the war effort. Later, this same style of bag would be reclaimed by women in the sixties as a down-to-earth counterpoint to the popular plastics of the space age. The priorities of the age determined the priorities of the handbag, including whether form came before function or vice-versa. In decades when women were breaking through barriers and boldly challenging social mores, they carried bags that reflected this. The brazen flapper of the 1920s carried a sleek, color-coordinated clutch with her she danced, drank, smoked, cut her hair short, walked the streets without a chaperone, and unashamedly wore makeup and pants. The nonconformist, sexually liberated hippies of the 1960s sported craftwork bags made of natural materials and personalized them with patches and artwork. Daring or dissident bags like these allowed women an additional way to express themselves during times of social change or upheaval. As the scientists developed daring new synthetic materials, these materials were also used to create modern handbags. When plastics began to be mass-produced in the 1950s, women carried handbags made of transparent lucite, a type of hard plastic. Though this new plastic was exciting, lucite bags could be dangerous: they were known to melt in the heat and let off toxic gasses! Popular bags of the sixties were made from similar space-age materials, such as PVC and polyurethane, though they had become much safer by then. Fire-retardant fleece, ballistic nylon, nylon webbing, velcro, and even kevlar have all been appropriated from other industries and used in women’s handbags. No doubt the next great breakthrough in material science will be reflected in the next generation of women’s bags. The Future of the Handbag The handbag’s past may not be long, only a recent few hundred years out of many millennia, but the history of the handbag is the history of women: women’s changing tastes, priorities, and roles in society. Handbags have thrived in times of excess and survived in times of scarcity, and even defied repeated calls by feminists to replace them with pockets. We cannot divine the future of the woman’s handbag. But, if its past is any indicator, we can be sure the handbag of the future will reflect the values of the woman of the future. TERMS OR RETURNSRETURNS ITS OK TO CHANGE YOUR MIND AND RETURN GOODS THERE IS A COST INVOLVED WITH THIS A BUYER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR POSTING THE ITEM BACK,THERE IS ANOTHER COST OF £2.99 FOR THE DELIVERY COST OF POSTING OUT THE ITEM TO BUYER AND IN CASES OF LARGE ITEMS OVER 2 KG THE COST IS £4.99. THESE INITIAL DELIVERY COSTINGS WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM THE REFUND AMOUNT Where we offer free postage we will minus our postage charges and refund amount. RETURNS POLICY ITS OK TO CHANGE YOUR MIND AND RETURN GOODS THERE IS A COST INVOLVED WITH THIS THE BUYER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR POSTING THE ITEM BACK,THERE IS ANOTHER COST OF £2.99 FOR THE DELIVERY COST OF POSTING OUT THE ITEM TO BUYER AND IN CASES OF LARGE ITEMS OVER 2 KG THE COST IS £4.99. THESE INITIAL DELIVERY COSTINGS WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM THE REFUND AMOUNTWHERE WE OFFER FREE POSTAGE WE WILL MINUS OUR POSTAGE COST FROM REFUND AMOUNTIMPORTANT PLEASE NOTE COULD ALL VALUED CUSTOMERS PLEASE CHECK ITEM DESCRIPTIONS PRIOR TO MAKING SELECTION PLEASE CONTACT IF YOU NEED ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON ANY ITEMS WE CAN ANSWER YOUR INQUIRY AS MAKING WRONG SELECTION THAT RESULTS IN BEING RETURNED WILL INVOLVE THE COST TO YOU OF SENDING THE ITEM BACK TO OURSELVES AND ALSO THE COST OF SENDING THE ITEM TO YOURSELVES AS WELL A Brief History of the Modern Suitcase Your carry-on suitcase is the result of nearly 1,000 years of innovation. The history of the suitcase is a story of people in migration. From newly arrived immigrants stepping off the boats at Ellis Island to first-time travelers boarding an airplane to a long-awaited destination, what people choose to carry and how is about more than functionality. Evolving to fit the trends and needs of its time, the suitcase has been indispensable to travelers of all kinds, while reflecting the things they value most. For example, Braceros, the Mexican workers who commuted back and forth to the U.S. in the mid-20th century, often left their home country with knapsacks or other bags but returned to Mexico carrying shiny new suitcases as a symbol of their accomplishments. The suitcase also signified that they were a different kind of traveler returning to Mexico, that they were no longer migrant workers but these cosmopolitan men, Mireya Loza, a labor and migration expert for the National Museum of American History, told Travel + Leisure. The suitcase then took on multiple meanings in terms of its status and function. The History of the Suitcase Courtesy of The Bracero History ArchiveWhile the popular imagination dates the beginning of the suitcase to the period of industrialization in the 1800s when well-heeled travelers stood on smoke-filled platforms ready to board their trains for summer excursions, the story begins much earlier. The Knights Templar were the first to make use of wheeled luggage. The soldiers used the wheeled cases to transport armor and other items as early as 1153 during the Crusades, according to some accounts. The recorded history of luggage for the next several hundred years remains sparse, with few specific accounts of how personal belongings were transported other than in trunks or bundles. By 1596, the Oxford English dictionary added the word luggage to its tomes. The word meant denoting inconveniently heavy baggage and came from the verb lug. Throughout the 17th and 18th century, art and literature portrays the migrations of people across Europe in particular, usually depicting travelers walking or riding horses as they carry knapsacks, bindles and other loose bags. The History of the Suitcase The golden age of luggage indeed arrived in the 19th century, as travel became a part of the social capital of the wealthy and powerful. This status shift is reflected even in the literature of the time, with pivotal moments and entire books being based off travel and its related technological advances. Whether it’s Anna Karenina waiting for her fateful train or Phileas Fogg refusing to take any trunks on his worldwide voyage, travel and its trappings began to occupy a larger space in the cultural imagination. The History of the Suitcase One of the most prominent real-life figures in this shift was Lou Vtton, a young Parisian trunk-maker who helped create one of the most recognizable luxury brands in the world. When the young Louis arrived in Paris at the age of 16 in 1821, he became an apprentice to box-maker Monsieur Maréchal. After honing his craft for 17 years, Vuton would finally open his own brand, under his name bearing the well-known logo. Securely packs the most fragile objects. Specializing in packing fashions, read Vuton’s first poster, according to Gentleman’s Quarterly. From that point on, Los Vuton products became more than a way of transporting fashion: They were fashion. Vuton is credited with creating the first slatted trunk that would become ubiquitous with train travel of the 19th century. The brand also built its reputation around the strength of its luggage locks, and Vtton even publicly challenged magician Harry Houdini to attempt to break out of one of his locks in 1890. Houdini reportedly did not respond. The History of the Suitcase Courtesy of Lis VutonAs industrialization, steamer travel and ever-widening railroads stretched from the 19th into the 20th century, more people than ever could travel. And trunk-makers rushed to outfit this new generation of travelers. What we now consider the suitcase was invented at the turn of the 20th century, and it was intended as a lightweight, compact carrier designed to transport a dress-suit without wrinkling it. Across the ocean from Vuion’s workshop, businessman Jesse Shwayder returned from New York to his hometown in Colorado to start a small business with his brothers in the early 1900s. The brothers opened shop in 1910 manufacturing trunks as the Shwayder Brothers. That company would become known as Samonite. Since then, the company has pioneered many of the innovations in luggage throughout the 20th century, spearheading the charge to use materials such as vulcanized fiber and polypropylene. Samonite is all about quality, innovation, durability,” Samonite spokesperson Stephanie Goldman told T+L, adding, “we have always been at the forefront of what’s new in luggage and we will continue to be.” The dawn of air travel ushered in a new era of innovation in luggage. As people worldwide took to the skies commercially in the late 1950s, travelers required suitcases that could fit in overhead compartments or be safely lugged around an airport. Synthetic materials became increasingly popular, as did plastic handles specifically, according to a report in the Smithsonian magazine in 2014. As many weary travelers can attest to, perhaps one of the greatest inventions in luggage in the 20th century came from Bernard Sadow, who first patented wheeled luggage in 1974. He came up with the idea while he was dragging heavy suitcases through customs following a family vacation to Aruba, according to The New York Times. Watching an airport employee push a cart of luggage on wheels, he crafted the idea of creating individual wheels for bags and added it to a line of the suitcases at the luggage company where he worked as a vice president. A brief history of the modern suitcase. Despite its utility, the idea did not take off immediately. Men in particular were very resistant to the idea of wheeled luggage, and certain department stores refused to carry the bags, saying that they were too effeminate for male customers. It was a very macho thing, Sadow told the Times. Eventually, consumers got past their preconceived ideas of rolled luggage, and wheels on suitcases are now just about as omnipresent as a handle. The next phase in the future of luggage includes smart technology such as devices that track your luggage remotely. The trend toward robotics has been seen across the travel industry, in particular with start-ups looking to create autonomous suitcases that can follow their owners around an airport. The History of the Suitcase TravelmateWhile autonomous luggage may sound like a foreign idea to some, it continues in the trend of what suitcase design has always aimed to do: adapt to a traveler’s to reflect their needs and preferences. With booms in budget airlines, more people have been able to travel than every before, and this growing population demands ease of use, durability and style. Robotic suitcases are just one answer to the demand for luggage to be as intuitive as our other devices.A Brief History of the Modern Suitcase Your carry-on suitcase is the result of nearly 1,000 years of innovation. The history of the suitcase is a story of people in migration. From newly arrived immigrants stepping off the boats at Ellis Island to first-time travelers boarding an airplane to a long-awaited destination, what people choose to carry and how is about more than functionality. Evolving to fit the trends and needs of its time, the suitcase has been indispensable to travelers of all kinds, while reflecting the things they value most. For example, Braceros, the Mexican workers who commuted back and forth to the U.S. in the mid-20th century, often left their home country with knapsacks or other bags but returned to Mexico carrying shiny new suitcases as a symbol of their accomplishments. The suitcase also signified that they were a different kind of traveler returning to Mexico, that they were no longer migrant workers but these cosmopolitan men, Mireya Loza, a labor and migration expert for the National Museum of American History, told Travel + Leisure. The suitcase then took on multiple meanings in terms of its status and function. The History of the Suitcase Courtesy of The Bracero History ArchiveWhile the popular imagination dates the beginning of the suitcase to the period of industrialization in the 1800s when well-heeled travelers stood on smoke-filled platforms ready to board their trains for summer excursions, the story begins much earlier. The Knights Templar were the first to make use of wheeled luggage. The soldiers used the wheeled cases to transport armor and other items as early as 1153 during the Crusades, according to some accounts. The recorded history of luggage for the next several hundred years remains sparse, with few specific accounts of how personal belongings were transported other than in trunks or bundles. By 1596, the Oxford English dictionary added the word luggage to its tomes. The word meant denoting inconveniently heavy baggage and came from the verb lug. Throughout the 17th and 18th century, art and literature portrays the migrations of people across Europe in particular, usually depicting travelers walking or riding horses as they carry knapsacks, bindles and other loose bags. The History of the Suitcase The golden age of luggage indeed arrived in the 19th century, as travel became a part of the social capital of the wealthy and powerful. This status shift is reflected even in the literature of the time, with pivotal moments and entire books being based off travel and its related technological advances. Whether it’s Anna Karenina waiting for her fateful train or Phileas Fogg refusing to take any trunks on his worldwide voyage, travel and its trappings began to occupy a larger space in the cultural imagination. The History of the Suitcase One of the most prominent real-life figures in this shift was Lou Vtton, a young Parisian trunk-maker who helped create one of the most recognizable luxury brands in the world. When the young Louis arrived in Paris at the age of 16 in 1821, he became an apprentice to box-maker Monsieur Maréchal. After honing his craft for 17 years, Vuton would finally open his own brand, under his name bearing the well-known logo. Securely packs the most fragile objects. Specializing in packing fashions, read Vuton’s first poster, according to Gentleman’s Quarterly. From that point on, Los Vuton products became more than a way of transporting fashion: They were fashion. Vuton is credited with creating the first slatted trunk that would become ubiquitous with train travel of the 19th century. The brand also built its reputation around the strength of its luggage locks, and Vtton even publicly challenged magician Harry Houdini to attempt to break out of one of his locks in 1890. Houdini reportedly did not respond. The History of the Suitcase Courtesy of Lis VutonAs industrialization, steamer travel and ever-widening railroads stretched from the 19th into the 20th century, more people than ever could travel. And trunk-makers rushed to outfit this new generation of travelers. What we now consider the suitcase was invented at the turn of the 20th century, and it was intended as a lightweight, compact carrier designed to transport a dress-suit without wrinkling it. Across the ocean from Vuion’s workshop, businessman Jesse Shwayder returned from New York to his hometown in Colorado to start a small business with his brothers in the early 1900s. The brothers opened shop in 1910 manufacturing trunks as the Shwayder Brothers. That company would become known as Samonite. Since then, the company has pioneered many of the innovations in luggage throughout the 20th century, spearheading the charge to use materials such as vulcanized fiber and polypropylene. Samonite is all about quality, innovation, durability,” Samonite spokesperson Stephanie Goldman told T+L, adding, “we have always been at the forefront of what’s new in luggage and we will continue to be.” The dawn of air travel ushered in a new era of innovation in luggage. As people worldwide took to the skies commercially in the late 1950s, travelers required suitcases that could fit in overhead compartments or be safely lugged around an airport. Synthetic materials became increasingly popular, as did plastic handles specifically, according to a report in the Smithsonian magazine in 2014. As many weary travelers can attest to, perhaps one of the greatest inventions in luggage in the 20th century came from Bernard Sadow, who first patented wheeled luggage in 1974. He came up with the idea while he was dragging heavy suitcases through customs following a family vacation to Aruba, according to The New York Times. Watching an airport employee push a cart of luggage on wheels, he crafted the idea of creating individual wheels for bags and added it to a line of the suitcases at the luggage company where he worked as a vice president. A brief history of the modern suitcase. Despite its utility, the idea did not take off immediately. Men in particular were very resistant to the idea of wheeled luggage, and certain department stores refused to carry the bags, saying that they were too effeminate for male customers. It was a very macho thing, Sadow told the Times. Eventually, consumers got past their preconceived ideas of rolled luggage, and wheels on suitcases are now just about as omnipresent as a handle. The next phase in the future of luggage includes smart technology such as devices that track your luggage remotely. The trend toward robotics has been seen across the travel industry, in particular with start-ups looking to create autonomous suitcases that can follow their owners around an airport. The History of the Suitcase TravelmateWhile autonomous luggage may sound like a foreign idea to some, it continues in the trend of what suitcase design has always aimed to do: adapt to a traveler’s to reflect their needs and preferences. With booms in budget airlines, more people have been able to travel than every before, and this growing population demands ease of use, durability and style. Robotic suitcases are just one answer to the demand for luggage to be as intuitive as our other devices.RETURNS POLICY UPDATE 060818 PLEASE NOTE FOR LEGAL REASONS WE HEREBY STATE THAT ALL BUYERSARE RESPONSIBLE FOR RETURN COSTS FOR REMORSE REASONS Condition: New with tags, Size: Large, Handbag Size: LARGE, Style: Tote, Product Line: CLASSIC LOOK, Material: Faux Leather, Theme: CLASSIC COLLECTION, Pattern: OSTRICH GRAIN EMBOSSED, Exact Dimensions: 38 x 30 x 15, Outer Material: Faux Leather, Main Colour: BLACK, UK SELLER: FAST DELIVERY, UK SHIPPING: 1 WORKING DAY, Texture: OSTRICH GRAINED, Features: OSTRICH GRAINED LOOK, Closure: Zip, Brand: MISS LULU

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